Publié le 24 Avril 2014

JOIN US MAY 30TH AT OUR GALA IN PORTLAND, OREGON!

Our relationship with the local community is intrinsically linked to the survival of great apes in the surrounding Mbargue Forest. Our Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center has impacted the economy of the local villages by providing jobs, installing a small grain mill and purchasing all fruits and vegetables to feed the chimpanzees from local farmers who grow the food especially for us.

IDA-Africa built a school in the village and contributes to the salaries of three schoolteachers. Our soon to be published children’s book will be used in the curriculum.

Since medical care is difficult to find and often impossible to afford, IDA-Africa has saved hundreds of human lives with medical treatments for local people, who are allowed to trade fruit and vegetables for the medical care.

Our engagement and positive impacts in the community have fostered goodwill and support for our conservation mission.

To buy tickets to the Gala

Our personnel manager Mr. Tchimisso Raymond is pictured with residents of the village of Bikol. Photo courtesy of Carol Yarrow.

IDA-AFRICA HELPS THE HUMAN COMMUNITY, TOO!

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Publié le 23 Avril 2014

FINGERS CROSSED FOR JACK!

In November 2004, IDA-Africa assisted the government of Cameroon with the confiscation of then 3-year-old Jack. Severely malnourished and desperately lonely, Jack was tied by his waist in a small, high-walled courtyard behind a house in the Cameroon town of Nanga Eboko. Jack rocked back and forth incessantly in an effort to comfort and calm himself.

At Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center Jack grew up in a social group of eight chimpanzees, which included adult male Kiki. Despite lingering emotional problems and frequently having his feelings hurt, Jack made friends in the group and managed fairly well as a juvenile. Unfortunately, when he reached adolescence he began to challenge Kiki without any support from anyone else in the group. The battles initiated by Jack were loud and violent.

Free-living chimpanzee males also fight for dominance, but among orphans in sanctuaries the conflicts can start at an earlier age and be worse because these groups often lack strong leaders and matriarchal support. The last and worst fight between Jack and Kiki left Jack with a broken arm, which became infected and took months to heal.

During the healing process we had to house Jack alone inside a large cage chamber, but he could visit with the chimpanzees from his group when they came in from the forest. He was always happy to see all of them except Kiki. For Kiki, Jack held a serious grudge, and by the time he was finally well, we knew we would need to find a new group for Jack.

Currently, we are trying to integrate Jack with handsome adult male Charlos and the six juveniles of various ages who live with him. So far it’s going well. We haven’t seen any aggressive displays directed at Jack or any aggression from him. He has been playing gently through the cage mesh with all of the juveniles. Charlos’ initial strategy was to pretend Jack didn’t exist, but recently he has approached and allowed Jack to groom him. We’re all hoping hard that Jack will be able to join the group outside soon.

We’ll keep you posted!

Photo of Jack from 2013, courtesy of Jacques Gillon

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Publié le 18 Avril 2014

ANITA AND SELMA UNSURE ABOUT THE MOVE AT FIRST!

Recently, we moved six-year-old Anita and five-year-old Selma, along with two other juveniles, to be integrated with a group of adult chimpanzees in a large enclosure complex that includes twenty acres of forest. Initially, caregivers carried Anita and Selma to the new enclosure in their arms, but the two young females weren’t convinced the move was a good idea. When they jumped down and traveled a half-kilometer back to their smaller enclosure, we had to bring out the transport cage. Fortunately, they soon became fascinated by the older chimpanzees in the larger group. Although the integration process will take many weeks, they are already forming bonds with several of the adult females. Pictured carrying Anita and Selma are: (clockwise from front right) Dr. Susan Donohue, caregiver Gomdong Julien, veterinary technician Nicholas Banadzem, maintenance worker Bipan Martin.

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Rédigé par IDA AFRICA BLOG

Publié le 18 Avril 2014

 Conference in Summerville

This past weekend IDA-Africa founder/director/veterinarian Sheri Speede was among the speakers at the International Primate Protection League conference in Summerville, South Carolina. Speakers included inspiring women and men from around the world, including IPPL's own Dr. Shirley McGreal. Congratulations to IPPL for pulling off another wonderful conference!

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Publié le 15 Avril 2014

IDA-AFRICA TRAPS AND NEUTERS FERAL CATS  NEAR OUR OFFICE IN THE CITY

We’re so pleased that talented American veterinarian Dr. Susan Donohue has become a part of our volunteer team at Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center. Although she usually works with our chimpanzees in the forest, last week Susan set up a surgical unit for cats in the kitchen of the office/apartment we share with Ape Action Africa in the city of Yaoundé. Working with Ape Action Africa veterinary technician Babila Tafon and our Sanaga-Yong Center manager Agnes Souchal, Susan has been trapping, neutering and releasing semi-domesticated and feral cats from a colony living nearby. Thank you Susan for helping cats as well as chimps!

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Publié le 6 Avril 2014

BIG CHANGE FOR MARGOT AND FRIENDS!

Margot (left) and Selma are two of four juveniles we moved over to Bikol’s group of 23, mostly adult, chimpanzees last week.
In February 2011, Cameroon authorities confiscated then one-year-old Margot soon after a hunter had killed her mother and and left her with a gunshot wound to the face. Margot’s painful injuries included a badly fractured jaw and a gaping ½-inch hole in the roof of her mouth, but with medical care at our Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center, she soon recovered and made good friends with slightly older juveniles Selma and Anita. Kanoa joined them in 2012.
Until last week the four were spending their days playing in the forest under the watchful eyes of their caregivers. Now they will face a challenging few months in a large cage chamber as we try to integrate them with the large group of older chimpanzees. We’ll proceed slowly and as safely as possible, but adult female Manni is already enjoying time inside with the “kids.” If the integration is successful, Margot and her friends will eventually join the big group in a 20-acre tract of forest, and the lives of all involved chimpanzees will be richer as a result.
We’ll keep you posted!

Photo courtesy of Jacques Gillon

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Publié le 29 Mars 2014

Bouboule is recovering !

During the last week, sweet elder female Bouboule has been very sick with what may be the same intestinal infection that nearly killed Jacky in January. We have been very worried, but today, she seems to have turned a corner. She drank and ate well this evening.
Bouboule spent nearly three decades in a small cage at the zoo in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Finally, in 2003, with the help of our friends at Ape Action Africa we were able to bring her to Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center. Here, in a five-acre forested enclosure Bouboule soon adopted not just one, but four juveniles, who have maintained close ties with her as they’ve matured into young adults. Occasionally, if they ask, she still shares her food with Aaron, Boumba, Jessica and Karmal.
Photo courtesy of Agnes Souchal.

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Publié le 22 Mars 2014

SIMON, ORPHAN OF THE BUSHMEAT TRADE, GROWS UP

In 2001, IDA-Africa rescued then one-year-old Simon soon after a poacher killed his mother. The loss of his mother was an irreparable tragedy for Simon. Among free-living chimpanzees maternal love and support are important not just for babies, but also for males and females as they mature through adolescence into adulthood. At our Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center, we couldn't replace Simon's mother, but he has had the opportunity to grow up healthy, in natural habitat, among friends. Thousands of kind supporters have made it possible for him and many others. Thank you! Photo display courtesy of Jacques Gillon and Kimber Webb

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Publié le 20 Mars 2014

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Rédigé par IDA AFRICA BLOG