Publié le 21 Février 2015

Fifteen-year-old Amigo was turned over to us by Cameroon authorities in April 2006. He had been confined in a small box in the compound of an affluent Cameroonian since he was an infant. Today, at Sanaga-Yong Rescue Center he's the dominant male in a social group of seven adults and adolescents.
Photo of Amigo, with Jimi peaking in, is courtesy ofJacques Gillon - photographe

Amigo becomes an adult !

Voir les commentaires

Rédigé par IDA AFRICA BLOG

Publié le 18 Février 2015

Kimbang (right) and Gnala, both orphans who were rescued and brought to Sanaga-Yong Center in late December 2014, are already great friends.
Photo courtesy of Ezequiel Carballo and Virginia Britos

Orphans chimps ...

Voir les commentaires

Rédigé par IDA AFRICA BLOG

Publié le 17 Février 2015

Voir les commentaires

Rédigé par IDA AFRICA BLOG

Publié le 15 Février 2015

Anemic little chimpanzee in a wooden box.

On 27th December Cameroon authorities arrived at Sanaga-Yong Rescue Center with a sad, malnourished, anemic little chimpanzee in a wooden box. A day earlier in the town of Bertoua, two hours away, some men had dropped the box on the street and run away when they saw police. Old scars around the baby’s waist from a rope that had cruelly restrained her, the filthy dark box and her frail physical and mental state left us to guess at the horrors she had endured after surviving the slaughter of her family. The name Kimbang means “white one” in the Northwest Cameroon dialect of our veterinary technician Nicholas Banadzem. The name was sadly descriptive of the little chimpanzee with too pale skin and sparse hair.

But with good nutrition and loving care at Sanaga-Yong Center Kimbang is recovering and growing stronger everyday. Three weeks after she arrived (above right) she was climbing small trees with joy and determination.

Voir les commentaires

Rédigé par IDA AFRICA BLOG

Publié le 12 Février 2015

Arrival of a new rescued baby chimpanzee

Just before Christmas last year we announced the arrival of a new rescued baby chimpanzee to Sanaga-Yong Rescue Center and requested suggestions for her name. We are excited to share with you that our staff in Cameroon chose the name Gnala, which was suggested to us by future volunteer Amy Hanes. It means “sweetie” or “sweetheart” in Zarma, a local language of Niger, and little Gnala already knows it's hers.

Voir les commentaires

Rédigé par IDA AFRICA BLOG

Publié le 10 Février 2015

Chimpanzees and vocalizations !

Chimpanzees communicate in many different ways. Vocalizations signify joy, sorrow, fear or excitement. “Displays” are meant to intimidate or show dominance and include stamping of their feet, screaming and puffing out their hair to make their bodies appear larger. Softer communication includes facial expressions and subtle body language. Just like people, chimpanzees enjoy kissing, embracing, touching, holding hands and grooming. Akiba vocalizing - Photo by Jacques Gillon

Voir les commentaires

Rédigé par IDA AFRICA BLOG

Publié le 31 Janvier 2015

Bouboule's Story

The history of Bouboule and Dorothy is Sanaga-Yong’s sweetest adoption story. Having been initially kept as a “pet”, Bouboule arrived at Sanaga-Yong a clingy, scared and insecure baby. He needed more mothering than other infants his age and never seemed to get enough love. Dorothy, an older female who had been kept on a neck chain for more than 25 years, never had a chance to be a mother. She had a very low status in her group and was always picked on. However upon adopting Bouboule as her son, she began asserting herself to stand up for him and gained considerable respect. Motherhood came naturally for Dorothy and the two were inseparable for many years until Dorothy passed away in 2008.

Today Bouboule remains in Jacky’s group of twenty-two. Although challenging as an adolescent, he has mellowed as a young adult and his friends include well-respected and liked Bikol. Photo courtesy of Jacques Gillon
Happy Birthday Bouboule!

Voir les commentaires

Rédigé par IDA AFRICA BLOG

Publié le 30 Janvier 2015

Carla's story

In August of 2012, a catholic priest delivered recently orphaned Carla to Sanaga-Yong. The dehydrated young infant had been given to the priest the day before by a hunter who thought she would die because she refused to eat. With the right kind of baby milk formula and specialized care at the Rescue Center, she quickly regained her good health.

Now Carla and slightly younger Nyanga are inseparable. The pair sleeps, eats and plays together. Currently the girls are lovingly cared for by the Sanaga-Yong staff, but soon they will benefit from the nurturing affection of adult chimpanzees. Adult females who haven’t given birth to babies will often experience motherhood by adopting orphans, thereby enriching all the lives involved. Soon Carla and Nyanga will be integrated into a spacious new enclosure to be paired with loving adult female chimps and introduced to other chimpanzees in the new habitat. Photo courtesy of Jacques Gillon
Happy Birthday Carla!

Voir les commentaires

Rédigé par IDA AFRICA BLOG

Publié le 28 Janvier 2015

Tic's Story

After his family was slaughtered and before he was rescued by IDA-Africa, Tic was kept as a "pet". He was rescued in February 2005 from an urban parking lot where the "cute" baby clothes he was wearing were amusing passersby. Living with a human family left him confused about who he was, and he still seeks emotional support from his human caregivers more often than most of our chimpanzees his age. However with the help of his friends, twelve-year-old Tic has learned that chimpanzees laugh, play and share lots of affection! He is the second oldest chimpanzee in his group and is a very important member who often intervenes in conflicts. He’s a favorite of caregivers and volunteers as well! Photo courtesy of Jacques Gillon
Happy Birthday Tic!

Voir les commentaires

Rédigé par IDA AFRICA BLOG